Safe Sex? It is possible.

Understand risky sexual activities and how to stay safe:

• Always use condoms with lubricants to prevent HIV/STDs/STIs

• Never assume your HIV/STDs/STIs status; get tested regularly

• Learn about PrEP and PEP to lower your risk of contracting HIV

Safe sex? It is possible.

Understand risky sexual activities and how to stay safe below:

  • Always use condoms with lubricants to prevent HIV/STDs/STIs
  • Never assume your HIV/STDs/STIs status; get tested regularly.
  • Learn about PrEP and PEP to lower your risk of contracting HIV

What is Safe Sex?

 

Dr. Sunil Solomon tells about what safe sex means and how can we keep ourselves safe from HIV and other sexual infections. After all, knowing is living!

Understanding Safer Sex
Sex is fun, yet Safety is peace of mind. Is it possible to have Safe Masti? Yassss! We share the best ways to do this.
What is Safer Sex?
Safer sex is all about having fun sex without running the risk of acquiring Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Hello Doctor Episode 1 Hello Doctor Episode 2 This includes taking certain responsible measures before, during and after sex. Sounds complicated? Far from it! Safer Sex is all about: Being Informed; Communicating with Partners; Using Condoms/PrEP; and, Getting (HIV/STD) Tested whenever needed.

Being informed: What You need to Know

What is an STD? What are the various types? How might I contract one? Which sexual activity puts me at risk of getting an STD? Symptoms? Preventive measures? Treatment? Questions, questions, questions… but hey, don’t worry, we have got the answers here. Knowledge is power. So, stay informed. That way, you’ll always make the right choices regarding your sexual activity and only turn your back on risky behaviour 😉

Being aware

Want to avoid STDs and HIV at all costs? Practice safe sex only and get tested for both STD and HIV frequently Safe sex can only be adventurous and fun too. Following safe sex practices in bed does not make sex boring. In fact, knowing that you and your partner(s) are safer from contracting HIV or STDs will make you feel freer and tension-free! If you think or have had a risky exposure to HIV or STD in the last three months, get tested immediately. Get Tested

Communicating with partners

Talk openly and frankly with your sexual partners about each other’s sexual interests, previous sexual partners, testing records and treatment for STDs. Honest is the new sexy!

Use Condoms with lubricants

Use condoms AND correctly: apply water-based lube, as it works better with a latex condom during anal or oral sex to prevent STDs and HIV. Also, using lubricant alone will not protect you from HIV or other STIs, so it is always important to use condoms as well. Most condom failures can be prevented by using condoms correctly and by using plenty of water-based lubricant.

Use PrEP

Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) is a new HIV prevention method in which an HIV negative person takes a prescribed antiretroviral drug (ARV) daily. (Hyperlink to the PrEP section). Get Tested Whenever Relevant Whenever you feel you have done something slightly risky, get tested. Sexual activity = higher risk of contracting STDs or HIV. Regular testing = early diagnosis/treatment of STDs or HIV. Early diagnosis/treatment = reduced health risks.

Important Links:

John Hopkins Medicine: HIV and AIDS: Commonly Asked Questions

Related Videos:

 

 

 

 


Isn’t Safer Sex only for people who have ‘risky’ sex?
Safe sex is a must for anyone who is sexually active! There are two types of sexual behaviours: RISKY and SAFE. Risky or Unsafe The following body fluids might contain disease-causing germs

  • Blood
  • Semen/Cum
  • Pre-seminal fluid/Precum
  • Saliva
  • Discharge from sores/blisters
  • Sometimes shedding from skin without a visible sore or blister (in cases such as Herpes). Read more at Risk Reckoner section

STDs (including HIV) can be transmitted anally, orally, or digitally if any of these germ-carrying body fluids come into contact with a nick in the skin or penis or lining of the anal canal. The risk of contracting an STD or HIV through such behaviour is higher. Please remember, ALL Sex is Risky. This is because any kind of sex will cause some minor, microscopic cuts, nicks and bleeders in the involved organs. Anal sex tops the list because the lining of the anus is very thin and it contains no natural lubrication. Anal Penetration can cause more damage and tearing to this thin lining – an open invitation to germs, infections, and virus.

Safe

Being Safe means avoiding any contact of body fluids between partners (and thus preventing transmission of STDs or HIV). It is Easy and Pleasurable to practice, by using condoms, dental dams, gloves etc. (Hyperlink to the Condoms and Lubricants section). Safe sexual behaviour also means avoiding sex altogether, if either you or your partner(s) have: mouth sore or blister bleeding gums tooth infection wound around your private parts pus or discharge from a wound cut in your finger (which might be used to pleasure your partner) Another way to keep HIV at bay is to get on PrEP Know More at PrEP section If there is anything on either of your bodies that looks abnormal or worrisome, don’t waste time. Go and get tested for STDs, both of you. Know more at Do I have HIV/An STD section Better safe than sorry. Always.

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: HIV Testing, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Related Videos:

 

 

 


What is a High-Risk activity?
Any sexual activity which could cause an exchange of body fluids is a high-risk activity. This means any sexual act that is performed without condom use is HIGH RISK. Does this means using a condom eliminates all risks? No. If the condom is worn incorrectly or reused, the risk remains high (without Lube, Condoms can tear allowing fluid exchang) Know more at Condoms and Lubricants section
Why are men who have sex with men at a higher risk for HIV/STD?

Multiple reasons for this:

 

  • Types of sexual activities they engage in (particularly high-risk is anal sex),
  • Multiple sexual partners
  • High use of injectable and non-injectable drug use (when under the influence of these drugs, chances of taking risks while having sex become much higher)

Related Videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhoY7Kx4lS0&t=7s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7XAlPmTC0At=4s

Isn’t Safe Sex boring?
Not at all! All types of fun, engaging sex can be Safe. By taking the recommended precautions, you can have all types of sex, with relative safety. Please watch our video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cJY-_E0qOU
What is the most foolproof way of preventing STDs and HIV?
Complete sexual abstinence!! Seriously! That’s the most foolproof way to prevent HIV/STDs. Next best is to self-pleasure (masturbation and use of sex toys limits exposure to others’ body fluids). If in a committed partnership, ensure Mutual Monogamy. In case you need more than that aka multiple sexual partners, then stay safe by Always Correctly Using a Condom and Getting tested regularly for HIV/STDs. You could also meet a doctor to get a prescribed dosage of PrEP. However, this will only protect you from HIV, and not any other STDs. Know more at Condoms and Lubricants section (Hyperlink to the Frequent testing section) (Hyperlink to the PrEP section)

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: HIV and AIDS: A Quick Guide

Related Videos:

 

 

 

Relevant Articles: Condom- Zaroori hai kya? (needs text formatting) http://safemasti.com/blog/condom-zaroori-hai-kya/ Private: Have Masti With A Condom!0 Here’s How… (needs new image, text formatting) http://safemasti.com/blog/masti-condom-heres/

How can I know if someone has an STD or HIV before agreeing to have sex with them?
You can’t. The only sure-fire way of finding out a person’s STD or HIV status is through testing. Sounds easy enough? Except you may not actually reviewing someone’s test reports before you have sex with them. So, what do you do? Follow these simple tips:

  • Always use condoms. Know more at Condoms and Lubricants section
  • Ask him frankly about his sexual interests, previous partners, knowledge and interest in safe sex, as well as his STD and HIV test status.
  • Say NO if he is unaware of his STD and HIV status and still insists on having unprotected sex.
  • Say NO if he insists on unsafe sex, even though he is tested and negative.
  • Say NO if you see any sores, blisters, discharge or cuts in his private parts.
  • Encourage your partner to use condoms and get tested frequently. (Hyperlink to the Frequent testing section)
  • Remember: STDs and HIV infections do not discriminate. Anyone can be positive, irrespective of their level of education, hygiene, sophistication, class or status.

    Important Links:

    Mayo Clinic: Health Issues for MSM and Gay Men

    Related Videos:


    Relevant Articles: Are you up for an Open Relationship? http://safemasti.com/blog/are-you-up-for-an-open-relationship/ Condom- Zaroori hai kya? (needs text formatting) http://safemasti.com/blog/condom-zaroori-hai-kya/

Is it enough to observe safe sex measures to protect yourself from HIV and other STDs?
No. A sexually active lifestyle automatically exposes you to the risk of contracting STDs or becoming HIV+. Especially if you have multiple sexual partners. While you can greatly reduce the risk by adopting safe sex measures, these are Not 100% fool proof. That’s why it is Essential to Get Tested frequently for STDs and HIV, while ALWAYS practicing safe sex. Just in case you have gotten infected, early detection of STDs and HIV allows for the most effective treatment. (Hyperlink to the Frequent testing section) Know more at Do I have HIV section

Related Videos:



I am very hygienic and have sex only with equally hygienic people. Am I at risk for STDs/HIV?
Being Hygienic is Great but it will Not Prevent STDs or HIV. Even a very hygienic person could have an STD or HIV.

Related Videos:

 

Relevant Articles:

Are you up for an Open Relationship? http://safemasti.com/blog/are-you-up-for-an-open-relationship/

I have sex only once a year. Should I still practice safe sex?
It’s like asking if you should wear a seat belt every time you drive a car! Safe sex (like wearing a seat belt!) is practiced for a very simple reason. Your protection. Why invite trouble when it can be so easily avoided?! So, Yes please practice safe sex even if you have sex only once a year.

Related Videos:

 

 


My date says he is HIV- and on PrEP. Can I do bareback with him?
PrEP protects against HIV. But not against any other STDs. Also, Anal Sex is the most high-risk of all sexual engagements. So always use condoms even if your partner is HIV- and on PrEP.

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: HIV and AIDS: A Quick Guide

Related Videos:

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuMJ0d4aiXo&t=1s<br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CYNV_uYY2M

I might have had sex with someone with STDs/HIV. What do I do?
Firstly, Don’t Panic. If you think you had sex with someone with STDs/HIV just now, do this:

  • Wash all your private parts thoroughly with soap and water.
  • Rinse your mouth with an antiseptic solution.
  • Avoid douching your anal canal with water.
  • Simply pass whatever semen/secretions you have in your anus.
  • Visit a doctor AT ONCE, preferably along with your partner, for testing and immediate treatment. (Hyperlink to the PEP section)
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions. You will be tested for HIV and other STDs and might be put on HIV-prevention tablets (PEP).

If you think you had sex with someone with STDs/HIV some time ago, do this:

  • Visit a doctor AT ONCE, preferably along with your partner, for testing and immediate treatment. (Hyperlink to the PEP section)
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions. You will be tested for HIV and other STDs and might be put on HIV-prevention tablets (if within 72 hours) (PEP).

 

Related Videos:

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuMJ0d4aiXo&t=1s<br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02jWzf1LfFo&t=1s<br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqbUnPYbvto

I noticed my date had some boils on his groin when we were having sex. Could this be an STD?
Yes, it could be. You can help in the following ways:

  • Talk to him. 
  • Ask him if he has sought medical advice for these boils.
  • If he hasn’t, tell him about STDs.
  • Encourage him to seek treatment from a doctor.

Even if he claims it is not an STD, act responsibly. Practice safer sex.

Related Videos:

 

 

 


Can I get STDs and HIV from sex toys?
Absolutely, if these toys are inserted into the anus or mouth or if they have been touched with body fluids. So, how can you prevent the spread of STDs and HIV from sex toys?

  • Always use a condom on toys
  • Change the condom when using a toy in different parts of your body (e.g. anus to mouth) and when switching between partners
  • Disinfect toys thoroughly when using them in different parts of the body
  • Wash them thoroughly when switching between partners
  • Use toys carefully to prevent tearing the lining of anus

Hello Doctor: Episode 2 (name needs to be corrected to Hello Doctor Ep2: Is Using Condoms Important?)

Related Videos:

 

 

 


How do I talk about Safer Sex with my partner?
To talk condom or not to talk condom: that is the big question! Awkward topic. Trust issues. Pressure. Embarrassment. Sure, all these words are linked to the subject of condoms. So are these: Safe sex. Responsible decision. Protection against STDs. Good health. It’s your choice. If you can’t persuade your partner to have safe sex, direct him towards safemasti.com. That’ll convince him!

Related Videos:

 

 

 

 

 


I am committed to my partner and have sex only with him. Can I have unprotected sex?
  • Are you both in a monogamous relationship?
  • Are you both getting tested regularly?
  • Have both of you tested negative for STDs and HIV at least twice, three months apart?

If you answered YES to all three questions, then sure, your risk of contracting STDs and HIV is very low. BUT, anal sex and rimming could cause infections such as Hepatitis A, Shigella and urethritis, which may be prevented by use of condoms and other barrier methods. So, protect yourself by using protection!

Related Videos:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Relevant Articles:

Are you up for an Open Relationship? http://safemasti.com/blog/are-you-up-for-an-open-relationship/ Condom- Zaroori hai kya? (needs text formatting) http://safemasti.com/blog/condom-zaroori-hai-kya/

Do you know your HIV risks?
Is kissing safe? Can giving a blowjob give me HIV? Can I get HIV from rimming? What STDs can I get from playing ‘water sports’? Could I possibly get STDs from fingering? Click here (PPT) to find out! PPT (attached) Title: Risk Reckoner – Know Your Risks, Stay Safer!
How do I know if I have HIV/an STD
If you are a person who is sexually active then you are at risk of having HIV or an STD. The only certain way of knowing if you have an STD/HIV or not is to get tested for them. Most of the STDs including HIV may not have any symptoms for a long time. (Hyperlink to the Frequent testing section)

Related Videos:

 

 

 

 

 

Important Links:

John Hopkins Medicine: HIV and AIDS: Commonly Asked Questions

What are the major STDs that I must know of?
There are many kinds of STDs that have been known to cause illness in humans. The common ones are listed here-

  • HIV or Human immunodeficiency virus
    • Symptoms: Starts as a flu like illness with fever, head ache, body ache, cold. Soon becomes better on its own and then for many years is without symptoms. When body becomes very weak after many years may have other problems like TB, Loose motion, Chest infection and other infections.
    • Diagnosed by: Blood test.
    • Treatment: Everyday single tablet.
  • Syphilis
      • Symptoms: Sores on penis or around penis, around anus or around mouth; rash on skin including palms and soles; swollen glands in groin.

    Diagnosed by: Blood test or swab test from a sore.

  • Treatment: Injection of antibiotics.
  • Gonorrhoea
    • Symptoms:  Yellow or green pus like discharge from penis, pain while passing urine, need to pass urine more frequently, pain in the anus, pain during passing stools.
    • Diagnosed by: Swab test from penis or anus or urine test.
    • Treatment: Antibiotics
  • Chlamydia
    • Symptoms: Watery or turbid discharge from penis, pain while passing urine, lower abdominal/stomach pain, pain in anus, pain in testis
    • Diagnosed by: Urine test or Swab test from penis or anus.
    • Treatment: antibiotics.
  • Hepatitis
    • Symptoms: Flu-like illness with fever, body aches, cold etc.; nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite. Later jaundice.
    • Diagnosed by: Blood test.
    • Treatment:
      • Hepatitis A = Gets better on its own.
      • Hepatitis B = May get better on its own or may require antiviral medications.
      • Hepatitis C = Requires antiviral medications
  • Herpes
    • Symptoms: Small blisters or sores or rash around penis or anus or mouth that are painful, itchy or tingle.
    • Diagnosed by: Physical examination, swab test from mouth or penis or from the blister.
    • Treatment: antiviral medications if the condition doesn’t clear on its own.
  • Genital warts
    • Symptoms: Brown or flesh colored, rough looking bumps around penis and anus that may be itchy. Painless.
    • Diagnosed by: Visible to the eye.
    • Treatment: Medical removal of the warts.
  • Pubic lice
    • Symptoms: itching around the private parts, usually worse at night, black spots in your underwear, small spots of blood on the skin near your private parts, visible lice or its eggs
    • Diagnosed by: Examination
    • Treatment: Medicated lotions and shampoos
What symptoms will an STD have?
Symptoms of STD will depend on the kind of STD one has contracted. But the general symptoms of an STD are –

  • Discharge from your penis: Yellow, Green, Pus like or watery
  • Pain when passing urine
  • Pain in your anus or while passing stools
  • Pain in your testicles
  • Pain in your lower abdomen
  • Itching, burning or tingling around your private parts
  • Blisters, sores, spots or lumps around your penis, anus or mouth
  • Black powder or tiny white dots in your underwear (this could be droppings or eggs from pubic lice)

Not everyone with an STD has symptoms. You should get checked if:

  • You have had unprotected sex.
  • Your sexual partner had unsafe sex with someone else
  • You have any of the above symptoms
  • Your sexual partner has any symptoms
How soon do symptoms appear for STDs and HIV?
It depends on which STD one has. Symptoms can develop within a few days or weeks, but sometimes they don’t appear until months or even years later. Often there are few or no symptoms and you may not know you have an STD. If there’s any chance you have an STD, find a local STD testing center or go to nearest doctor for a Check-up.

STD Symptoms When do they appear# How many do not have symptoms
HIV Fever, sore throat, body ache, head ache, rash on skin 2-6 weeks 30% have no symptoms even during this period. After this period 100% are asymptomatic for many years to come
Syphilis Sores in and around penis Sores in and around anus Sores in and around mouth Skin rash Swollen glands in groin 14-21 days Symptoms are often not obvious and may come and go
Gonorrhoea Yellow or green pus discharge from penis Pain while passing urine Need to pass urine more frequently Pain in the anus Pain during passing stools 2-10 days 10% do not have symptoms
Chlamydia Watery or turbid discharge from penis Pain while passing urine Lower abdominal/stomach pain Pain in anus Pain in testis 7-21 days 50% do not have symptoms
Herpes Small blisters, sores or rash around genitals Painful, itchy or tingly 4 -7 days Most people do not have symptoms when first infected
Hepatitis- B Flu-like illness with fever, body aches, cold Nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite. Later jaundice. 6 weeks to 6 months 50% are symptomatic
Warts Small painless itchy flesh colored coarse bumps 2-3 months Often mistaken for normal skin

# – Exceptions always exist. Sometimes diseases do not manifest for much longer times after exposure.

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: STD Testing: What’s Right for You?

Related Videos:

 

 


I have just been diagnosed with an STD. What do I do now?
Do not panic. Calm down. The biggest hurdle in treating STDs and HIV is knowing who has the illness. Now that we know you have, half of the battle is won. Most STDs have complete cure with a short course of antibiotics. Even those which do not have a cure, can be very well controlled with medicines so that it doesn’t affect your sexual, physical and mental health. These are the 3 things that you need to know if you have recently been tested positive for an STD.

  1. Go see a doctor who is an expert in treating STDs. He may advice you to get a few more tests and will soon start you on medications. There are a lot of government hospitals which are equipped with centers for treatment of all STDs and HIV. (Refer to the Frequent testing section) Get on to treatment soon.

Avoid approaching “desi” doctors and “Babas” and “Hakeems” or doctors who advertise in newspaper as experts in “guptrog” or those that advertise along the railway tracks. Avoid herbal treatment/ayurvedic medicines.

  1. Inform your sexual partner/s and sexual contacts about the need for them to get tested. Your partner may also be infected and not know it and needs to get tested and treated. Also, without treatment, your partner may pass the STD back to you (after you are cured) or to others.

It may be emotionally uncomfortable, but telling your partners about STDs allows them to protect their health, too. Being diagnosed with an STD can cause many strong emotions. You may begin to question your trust in your partner or be worried that they will question their trust in you. Before you blame anyone, know that STDs are common and don’t always cause symptoms. It is possible that you or your partner got the STD in a previous relationship without even knowing it. Keeping that in mind, talk to your partner as soon as possible. Be honest and straightforward. During and after your talk, your partner may also have many strong emotions. The most helpful thing you can do is listen to your partner’s concerns and fears and offer information about the STD and its symptoms and treatment. Give your partner time to absorb this information. Help your partner understand that they may also have the STD. Sometimes, no one knows for sure who had the infection first.

  1. Get tested again and always play safe. Getting tested again helps you in confirming successful treatment of STDs and knowing if you missed any STD/HIV in your previous test. Also, if you have got any new STD. (Refer to the Frequent testing section)

It’s common to get infected with STDs again. Even if you and your partner took medicine, you should be retested in 3 months. A good way to remember is to set a notification on your phone or email, ask your doctor’s office or clinic to remind you, or scribble a note on your calendar—whatever you need to do to make sure you stay healthy! Safer sex can prevent you from getting STDs again. (Refer to the Safer sex section)

I have just been diagnosed with HIV. What do I do now?
Calm down. Do not panic. Let us guide you through the journey of living with HIV. (Refer to the Living with HIV section)

Related Videos:

 

 

 

 

 

Relevant Articles:

*I AM HIV+… AND I AM STILL SMILING http://safemasti.com/living-positive/i-am-hiv-and-i-am-still-smiling/ *Difference between being HIV+ and having AIDS http://safemasti.com/living-positive/difference-between-being-hiv-and-having-aids/

Can anyone have both HIV and STD?
Yes. As a matter of fact, it commonly occurs together. Presence of an STD increases the chances of getting HIV infection during sex. Therefore, most people who have an STD will be advised to take a HIV test along with STD tests and vice versa.
Are STDs and HIV curable?
There are broadly 2 kinds of STDs.

  1. Those caused by bacteria – This included Syphilis, Chlamydia, Gonorrhea etc. These can be completely cured with courses of antibiotics
  2. Those caused by viruses – This includes HIV, Herpes, Hepatitis, Warts etc. Many of them are self-limiting such as Hepatitis A. But the others require treatment to keep them under control and prevent them from causing damage to body.

Related Videos:

 


What is the difference between HIV and AIDS?
HIV is a virus which can infect humans through sex, through blood transfusions, through sharing needles and from mother to child. AIDS is a condition which occurs many years after infection with HIV (if no treatment is taken) due to the damage the HIV virus causes to the human body. It is the last stage of HIV infection. In this condition the cells in the body which are responsible for fighting infections are lost due to HIV and therefore the body becomes weak and susceptible for infections and cancers. Therefore, having HIV infectionDOES NOT mean the person has AIDS. If a person with HIV infection begins treatment early and takes regular treatment then you can prevent his body from going into AIDS.

Related Videos:

 

*Difference between being HIV+ and having AIDS

How long does it take for HIV infection to become AIDS?
Previously, when there was no treatment for HIV available, HIV infection would take about 10 years’ time to become AIDS. But currently, with the available treatment for HIV, AIDS can be completely prevented from occurring if the patient takes regular treatment.

Relevant Articles:

*Difference between being HIV+ and having AIDS http://safemasti.com/living-positive/difference-between-being-hiv-and-having-aids/

Related Videos:

 


I might have had sex with someone who has an STD/HIV. What do I do?
If you think you have had sex with someone with STD/HIV just now, then this is what you need to do-

  1. Wash all your private parts thoroughly with soap and water
  2. Rinse your mouth with an antiseptic solution
  3. Avoid douching your anal canal with water but just express out any semen/secretions if you have any in your anus
  4. Go and see a doctor immediately, preferably along with your partner, for testing and immediate treatment. (Hyperlink to the PEP section)
  5. You will be required to go through tests for HIV and other STDs and if you may be put on tablets to prevent you from HIV (PEP).

If you think you had sex with someone with STD/HIV some time ago, then this is what you need to do-

  1. Go and see a doctor immediately, preferably along with your partner, for testing and immediate treatment. (Hyperlink to the PEP section)
  2. You will be required to go through tests for HIV and other STDs and if you may be put on tablets to prevent you from HIV (if within 72 hours) (PEP).

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: STD Testing: What’s Right for You?

Related Videos:

 


Are there any vaccines available for STDs and HIV?
Vaccine for HIV is under trial. Hopefully in a few more years this must be available for all of us. Vaccines for Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) are available. Please see a medical doctor for advice on these.
If I test positive for HIV, does that mean that I will die?
Although HIV cannot be cured, it can be very well controlled and suppressed with modern treatment. Due to this, the life expectancy for people with HIV has improved rapidly over the past 20 years. This means the life expectancy for someone who is living with HIV, on treatment and responding to treatment is no different to the general population. However, if you have HIV, your personal life expectancy will depend on several factors. These include how early the condition was diagnosed, how early treatment began, your gender, and whether you smoke or misuse drugs or alcohol. Have More Questions on HIV? Visit Our Living with HIV Section.

Relevant Videos:

 

 

 

 

 

Related Articles:

*I AM HIV+… AND I AM STILL SMILING http://safemasti.com/living-positive/i-am-hiv-and-i-am-still-smiling/ *Difference between being HIV+ and having AIDS http://safemasti.com/living-positive/difference-between-being-hiv-and-having-aids/

Why frequent testing is important?
Frequent testing is an important and a proven way of staying safe. It is advisable to get frequently tested, every 3-6 months, for HIV and STDs, especially if you are sexually active. It is important because –

  • Many STDs do not have symptoms.
  • Available methods of safer sex are not 100% effective in preventing STDs.
  • Most STDs, including HIV, are most infectious in the early phase of the disease when the tests may be negative and there are no symptoms. This makes frequent testing the only means of knowing if one has an early and most infectious stage of STD or not.

There are major health gains from detecting and treating STDs and HIV early. It is easiest to treat all STDs in the early stages and HIV infection that is picked up and treated early can lead to a near normal life and life span for the person. (Book a test)

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: HIV Testing and It’s importance Mayo Clinic: STD Testing: What’s Right for You?

Related Videos:

 

 

 


How frequent is frequent?
This depends on a lot of factors including your number of partners, your frequency of sex, your use of condoms or PrEP, your use of injectable drugs, your contact with commercial sex workers etc. There is no one size fits all approach here.  A schedule can be worked out by your doctor after knowing your life style. Be honest with your doctor about your sexual practices otherwise he/she will not be able to help you. A rough guide for the testing is –

  1. A screening test for HIV every 6 months to 1 year.
  2. Once a year tests which screen for Syphilis, Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea.

These can be more frequent, like once in 3-6 months, if you are sexually more active and often have unprotected sex or involve in other high-risk activity. (Refer to question on high risk activity)


I always use condom, do I still need to get tested?
If you always use a condom and correctly use a condom, then you may get away with getting tested less frequently, like once in a year. But by the very nature of being Gay/Bi or MSM, one is at high risk and must get tested at least once a year.

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: HIV Testing and It’s importance Mayo Clinic: STD Testing: What’s Right for You? Avert: More on Condoms and Lubricants

Related Videos:

 

 

 

 


I have no symptoms. Why should I get tested?
Because many STDs including HIV often exist without symptoms. (Refer to Do I have STD/HIV section)
I had unsafe sex yesterday. Do I get tested immediately?
Go and see a doctor immediately, preferably along with your partner, for testing and immediate treatment. (Refer to the PEP section). You will be required to go through tests for HIV and other STDs and you may be put on tablets to prevent you from HIV (if you reach the treatment facility within 72 hours) (PEP). You will also need to get tested again after about 3 months , to allow sufficient time for all infections to show in the blood since the exposure.

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: HIV Testing and It’s importance Mayo Clinic: STD Testing: What’s Right for You?

I was negative 6 months ago and have not had sex since then. Should I get tested again?
The answer to this really depends on when was the last you had sex before you last test. If sufficient time (like 3 months) had passed since your last sex when you got tested 6 months ago and if you have not had sex since that test, then you need not get tested again till you become sexually active again. But if you had sex like a few days before your last test 6 months ago, then there is a chance of having missed the infection in your last test. So, it is advisable to get tested again. (Refer to question on window period)
I was negative when I started PrEP. Should I get frequently tested?
Being on PrEP mandates you that you get yourself tested for HIV every 3 months. It is prudent to even get STD tests done once in 3-6 months.

Related Videos:

 

 

 


I have sex only once in a year or so when I am travelling. How often should I get tested?
If you are having safe sex each time, then a screening test for HIV and STDs once a year may be sufficient. But if you are having unprotected sex, then you will have to get a test once immediately after and once more after about 3 months since the exposure each time.
I am committed to my partner and have sex only with him. Should I get frequently tested?
If your partner is also having sex with only you and if both of you are tested negative for STDs and HIV on at least 2 occasions 3 months apart, then the risk of STDs and HIV is very low. Until one of you has sex outside the relationship, you may not get tested so frequently after your initial pair of tests.
What has High-Fun got to do with STDs or HIV?
Drugs and sex are a “deadly” combination. Even literally so. (Refer to High risk activity on Safe sex section). Drugs along with sex is a very high-risk activity for contracting HIV or other STDs for the following reasons-

  1. During the use of injectable drugs, there is a risk of contracting many STDs and HIV, along with other diseases, through the sharing of needles.
  2. Under the influence of drugs (or even alcohol), individuals tend to be over confident, display poor judgement and generally take risks which would increase his risk of STD/HIV.  In some cases, one may not even recollect all the events that happened under the influence of substance. A recent study has shown that 3 out of 4 men had participated in reckless sexual activity while high on drugs.
  3. There are also general health risks which have been noted to occur in excess such as the risk of overdosing, being hospitalised, losing consciousness, having panic attacks or convulsions and serious mental health problems.
  4. Drugs may allow prolonged sex. This causes a lot more damage to the lining of anal canal and penis and much more contact of body fluids with blood. This also means a possibility of multiple partners. Some drugs alter pain and have anaesthetic effect which may cause more forceful sex between partners and increase the risk of HIV and STDs.
  5. Many people also suffer from sexual assaults after passing out from drugs.

All of the above is bad news for STDs and HIV prevention. Studies have shown that over half of the men who do “chemsex” would have an STD by the year end!

I do only poppers and no other hard drugs. Am I also at increased risk of HIV?
Poppers per se do not give very long durations of ‘high’ and may not significantly alter judgment. But studies have shown that poppers use alone can increase the chance of getting HIV byup to 5 folds! The reason is partly psychological and partly biological. The psychological part is the fact that poppers are only used when someone wants to be involved in ‘risky’ sex or ‘adventurous’ sex and poppers are mostly not the only dish on menu for the night. The biological bit of reason is that it is mostly the bottom partners who use poppers to ease them in performing anal sex. Not only is it relaxing the anal muscles, it is also relaxing the blood vessels in and around the anal canal causing it to bring in more blood and increasing the possibility of establishing an infection, if there is a breach of the lining. So, poppers DO INCREASE the risk of HIV and STDs and extra vigilance must be taken while having “high fun”
What are the precautions I need to take for “High Fun”
High fun is never 100% safe. So, if you do have high fun often, it is advisable that you get periodic HIV and STD tests. (Refer to Frequent testing section) But there are ways of reducing the risk.

  • Never be under pressure – It’s important to never feel pressured into taking any substances that you aren’t comfortable or familiar with. It’s often difficult to know the strength of illicit drugs so, to limit the risk of overdosing, it’s safest to take just a small amount of substance at a time.
  • Pack some protection – Always carry your condoms and lube, well in excess of what might be required. Do not forget to pack PrEP if you are on it. (Refer to Condoms and Lubricant section) (Refer to PrEP section)
  • Party with people you trust – Plan to keep an eye on each other and put rules in place for group safety.
  • Set your limits – Talk about preferred methods of protection and be clear about what kinds of sex you are and aren’t into
  • Stay aware – Keep tabs of what drugs and dosage you’ve consumed, and how they might affect your overall well being
  • Set reminders – If you’re taking PrEP to prevent HIV, or require antiretroviral medication (ARVs) if you are living with HIV, use an alarm to ensure you take your pills at the correct times.
  • Know your status – Most HIV transmissions occur among people who have only recently caught HIV and don’t know yet that they are positive. Regular testing to check your status will help to keep yourself and others healthy. (Refer to Frequent testing section)
I am just snorting. Can this still cause STD/HIV?
If snorting drugs, avoid sharing or passing around notes or straws as Hepatitis C can be passed on in this way.
I inject drugs for sex. How do I avoid HIV?
The best way of avoiding HIV in this case would be by discontinuing injectable drug use. You could see a medical doctor for more help. If you continue injecting drugs

  1. Never share needles
  2. Get sterile needles and syringes for each injection.
  3. Use sterile water to fix drugs.
  4. Always clean your skin with a new alcohol swab before you inject.
  5. Be careful not to get someone else’s blood on your hands or your needles.
  6. Safely dispose of used ones. Use a sharps container, or keep used needles away from other people.
  7. Get tested for HIV every 6m to 1 year. (Refer to Frequent testing section)
  8. Consider going on PrEP. (Refer to PrEP section)
  9. Use a condom each time you have sex. (Refer to Condoms and Lubricants section)

 

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: Health Issues for MSM and Gay Men

Condoms and Lubricants
Get your safe sex kit ready! Always use condoms with lubricants to lower your risk of contracting HIV and STDs.
What is the big fuss about condoms?
Condom is a simple device which can protect an individual from STDs and HIV. It is simple, easy to use, inexpensive and without any side effects making it a near ideal candidate for control of spread of any STD. On correct and consistent use, it is highly effective in preventing STDs and HIV. It can be used during both anal and oral sex. (Hyperlink to Tan Mann Ki Baat videos). It can be cut open and used as a dental dam during rimming.

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: Male Condoms: Everything You Need to Know Avert: More on Condoms and Lubricants

 

Related Videos:

Why condoms and why not PrEP?

In an ideal situation, it is condom WITH PrEP. Combined use of PrEP with condom has shown to provide better protection than just the use of PrEP or condom. (Hyperlink to PrEP).

Related Videos:

 

 

 

Relevant Articles:

Condom- Zaroori hai kya? (needs text formatting) http://safemasti.com/blog/condom-zaroori-hai-kya/ Private: Have Masti With A Condom! Here’s How… (needs new image, text formatting) http://safemasti.com/blog/masti-condom-heres/

Does condom provide 100% protection against HIV and STDs?
No. But when used correctly and every time you have sex, condoms are the best way to prevent STDs and they provide a high level of protection from HIV. Improper use of condoms (Refer to question on the right way of using a condom) and not using the right lube may significantly reduce the effectiveness of a condom. Studies have shown that proper and consistent (every time) use of condoms during anal sex reduces the chance of acquiring HIV infection by about 70-80% as compared to bareback sex. So, there is still a small risk of acquiring HIV infection despite proper and regular use of condoms. Similar figures may apply for other STDs. Therefore, it is advisable that you use other means of preventing STDs and HIV along with condoms (Refer to question on what the ways of are having sex safer). For example, Condoms with PrEP or Condoms with frequent testing. Safe Masti would like to encourage you to get tested often for STDs and HIV if you are a person with an active sexual life.

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: Male Condoms: Everything You Need to Know

Related Videos:

 

I do not maintain erection with a condom. What do I do?
Often this is due to the anxiety associated with the use of a condom. It’s a great idea to practice putting on a condom a few times before you’re actually in a situation where you’re about to have sex. This can help you to feel more at ease when the time comes and get you used to the feel of the condom. Sometimes it also because of a perceived pause during sex to wear a condom. To overcome this, make putting on a condom a fun part of foreplay – keep touching and kissing as you put it on – you can also get your partner to put it on for you.
I do not enjoy sex with a condom. What do I do?
Perhaps, you have not tried the feel thin condoms?

Related Videos:

Relevant Articles:

Condom- Zaroori hai kya? (needs text formatting) http://safemasti.com/blog/condom-zaroori-hai-kya/ Private: Have Masti With A Condom! Here’s How… (needs new image, text formatting) http://safemasti.com/blog/masti-condom-heres/

How to correctly use a condom?
  • One condom is for one-time use. Even if you remove a condom before penetration, you should not reuse it. Use a new one each time you have sex.
  • Condoms have a use-by date on the packaging. Don’t use out-of-date condoms.
  • Take the condom out of the packet, being careful not to tear it with jewelry or fingernails. Do not open the packet with your teeth
  • Put the condom on as soon as an erection occurs and before any sexual contact (whether anal or oral)
  • Place the condom over the tip of the erect penis.
  • If there’s a teat on the end of the condom, use your thumb and forefinger to squeeze the air out of it.
  • Gently roll the condom down to the base of the penis
  • If the condom won’t roll down, you may be holding it the wrong way around. If this happens, it may have sperm on it, so throw it away and try again with a new one.
  • Make sure that the penis does not touch the anus or mouth before a condom has been put on – the germs causing STDs and HIV can be present even in the precum.
  • Use generous amount of a water based or a Silicone based lubricant. DO NOT USE AN OIL BASED LUBRICANT SUCH AS BABY OIL OR MOISTURIZER OR VASELINE.
  • After sex, withdraw the penis while it’s still erect – hold the condom on at the base of the penis while you do this.
  • Remove the condom from the penis soon after ejaculation, being careful not to spill any semen.
  • Throw the condom away in a bin, not down the toilet.
  • If you have sex again, use a new condom.

Condoms are most effective when used properly, which includes using one that is the right size. Condoms come in different widths and lengths, so it may take a while to find the right condom.

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: Male Condoms: Everything You Need to Know Avert: More on Condoms and Lubricants

Related Videos:

I have had many instances of condom breaking during sex. Why is this happening and what should I immediately do when this happens?
  • There could be many possible reasons for condom breaking/splitting
    1. Improper use of lubricant: For a latex condom, water based, or a silicone-based lubricant is the one to be used. Use of oil-based lubricants such as Vaseline, moisturizer, body lotions etc. can cause damage to latex condoms and cause them to break.
    2. Inadequate use of lubricant: Use copious amount of lubricant to begin with and keep topping up during sex as and when they dry up. This is especially true for water-based lubricants.
    3. Improper donning of a condom: If the air in the tip of the teat has not been completely evacuated.
    4. There may have been damage done to the condom during wearing by either a fingernail or a jewelry or a tooth used to open the packet.

    When this happens-

    1. Withdraw the penis immediately and use a new condom
    2. If there was already an ejaculation, then remove as much semen as possible without douching the anus (douching may push up semen deeper into bowels and aid in spread of infection)
    3. Both partners should be tested for HIV and STIs – Most sexual health professionals will advise you to have a sexual health test around 10 days after unprotected sex or if a condom breaks (or earlier if you’re worried about any symptoms) and then again around three months later.
    4. Access emergency HIV treatment if you are at risk of HIV infection – If your partner is HIV positive or you do not know the HIV status of your partner and he is not available for testing along with you after the accident.  (link to pep section)

Important Links:

Avert: More on Condoms and Lubricants

Related Videos:

Are there condoms for rimming?

Yes. They are called dental dams. They are a square piece of latex, used as a barrier between mouth and anus during rimming to prevent contact of mouth with the anus. A condom can be cut open to make a dental dam if one can’t find it in the market.

I am too shy to buy a packet of condom. What are the alternatives?
Unfortunately, there are no alternatives to use of Condoms for preventing STDs and HIV. PrEP (Hyperlink to PrEP) can provide protection from HIV infection but cannot protect from STDs. On the other hand, there is an alternative to buying condoms from a chemist – Shop online. (Hyperlink to Shop online)

Important Links:

Avert: More on Condoms and Lubricants

Related Videos:

 

Is it enough if I wear a condom each time I am having sex?
Wearing it properly with all its precautions, using a suitable lubricant and frequent testing will enhance your fun and prevent you better from STDs and HIV.

Important Links:

Mayo Clinic: Male Condoms: Everything You Need to Know

Related Videos:

 

 

 

I feel good with saliva or moisturizer. Should I use a lube?
One of the reasons for failure of condom is the improper use of lubricants. All condoms come mildly lubricated. But this is not sufficient for anal sex. Anal sex requires additional lubrication and when we do not provide a suitable additional lubricant, the condom ruptures or splits and exposes one to STDs and HIV. Water based lubricants and silicone-based lubricants are suitable for all kinds of condoms. Oil-based products – such as moisturizer, lotion and Vaseline – can damage condoms. Saliva is not really a lubricant and involves risk of transfer for some STDs.

Important Links:

Avert: More on Condoms and Lubricants

Related Videos:

[emebed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuMJ0d4aiXo&t=140s[/embed]
I am a Bottom in bed. So why should I buy condoms? Is it not a Top’s job to buy condoms?
Your health is your responsibility.
I was given weird looks by the chemist when I went to buy lube. Therefore, I do not want to again attempt buying lube. What is the alternative?
Shop online here. (Hyperlink to Shop online)

Related Videos:

A PILL A DAY KEEPS HIV AWAY: PrEP
  • PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) is an HIV prevention medicine to reduce your risk of contracting HIV. It is important to consult a doctor before you start on PrEP, and works best against HIV if you follow safe sex practices like using condoms with lubricants.
    • If you are HIV positive, you need to immediately start on HIV treatment or ART (Antiretroviral Therapy) instead of taking PrEP. Find out more about this in our Living with HIV section (link).
    • If you are HIV negative, you can consult a doctor about your eligibility for PrEP and buy it online (buy prep link) using your prescription

    If you do not know your HIV status, get tested for HIV now and consult a doctor with your results

What is PrEP?
PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. It involves taking a combination of two HIV drugs by an HIV negative individual to prevent HIV infection. Typically, this is recommended for individuals involved in high risk sexual activity or people with a HIV positive partner. It prevents HIV from establishing an infection, even if it enters the body. It is highly effective (over 90%) when used daily and the efficacy drastically reduces when used inconsistently (about 50%). When PrEP is used with condoms, the risk of HIV transmission is almost zero.

Does PrEP prevent me from all forms of STDs?
No. PrEP only prevents from HIV infection. It provides about 90% protection from getting HIV infection through anal sex and about 70% protection from getting HIV through infected needles when used consistently. But 0% protection from Syphilis, Gonorrhea, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Chlamydia, Syphilis etc. The best way of preventing other STDs is to use condoms regularly and correctly. (Refer to the section on Condom)
Am I eligible for PrEP?
PrEP is only for HIV negative individuals. The first step to know you are eligible is to know your HIV status. If you the HIV Test shows you are Negative, and you feel you are at high risk of getting HIV in the future you may consider getting a prescription for PrEP.

  • You should consider taking PrEP if you are –
    1. Having sex without condoms. We would strongly recommend using condoms with lubricants either ways, as it not only would protect you from HIV, but STDs/STIs too.
    2. Having a partner who is HIV positive.
    3. Sharing needles with others for injection drug use.
    4. Having sex with persons of unknown HIV status.

Also, you will need to get some kidney tests before you are put on PrEP. If you have kidney ailments you may not be eligible for PrEP. Also, if you are hepatitis B or Hepatitis C positive, you may not be eligible for PrEP. The best way to know about your eligibility for PrEP is to consult a doctor.

I am on PrEP. Do I need to get HIV test done?
Of course. Please remember PrEP only provides about 90% protection from HIV and only when a tablet is taken every day without fail. This still leaves a 10% risk of contracting HIV. Also, PrEP does not provide any protection against other STDs like Syphilis, Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Herpes, hepatitis etc. Therefore, it is mandatory to get an HIV test and tests for STDs done EVERY 3 MONTHS. If you become HIV positive while on PrEP, the PrEP needs to be immediately changed to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) to prevent development of resistance of HIV to HIV medications used in PrEP.
How long do I need to take PrEP?
You must continue to use PrEP if you continue to be at high risk for HIV. If your risk of HIV changes either due to consistent and correct use of condoms or due to some other change in your sexual practices and behaviour, then you may discontinue the use of PrEP after consultation with your doctor. Do get a repeat HIV and STD tests even after you discontinue PrEP.
Are there side effects of PrEP?
Studies have shown that some people may have side effects early in the treatment such as upset stomach, nausea and mild headache. Usually these are mild and reduce within a month. But if they are severe, PrEP may have to be discontinued.
Do I need to take PrEP everyday even when I am not having sex every day?
Yes, the current recommendation is one pill every day even if you do not have sex every day. Irregular treatment with PrEP has shown poor protection against HIV infection.
What are the precautions I need to take while I am on PrEP?
  • The most important precaution is to take the pill every day without fail. PrEP provides protection only when it is taken consistently. The protection falls with reduced consistency in taking medicines.
  • Do not forget to use condoms, even when you are regular on PrEP. Only condoms can prevent you from sexually transmitted diseases such as gonorrhoea and chlamydia.
  • You must get tests for HIV and other STDs every 3 months while on PrEP. It is important to know if you become HIV positive while on PrEP because of the risk of resistance. If you are HIV positive or become HIV positive while on PrEP, then you need to be soon started on anti-retroviral therapy (ART).
How is PrEP different from PEP and ARV?
PrEP

PrEP PEP ART
Taking medicines BEFORE EXPOSURE to HIV Taking medicines AFTER possible EXPOSURE to HIV Taking medicines every day AFTER testing POSITIVE to HIV
Your HIV status is NEGATIVE Your HIV status is NEGATIVE Your HIV status is POSITIVE
It is a ROUTINE PREVENTIVE measure It is an EMERGENCY PREVENTIVE measure It is a TREATMENT measure
One pill to be TAKEN EVERYDAY TILL YOU CHOSE to be on PrEP One or two pills to be TAKEN EVERYDAY FOR 28 DAYS One or two pills to be TAKEN EVERYDAY FOR YOUR LIFE TIME
PREVENTS HIV infection PREVENTS HIV infection CONTROLS HIV infection and PREVENTS it from spreading to others
Prevents HIV infection from ALL SEXUAL ACTS Offered only for ANAL SEX and INJECTION DRUG USE Offered to ALL HIV POSITIVE persons
Involves TWO HIV drugs Involves THREE HIV drugs Involves THREE HIV drugs
MILD side effects MILD side effects MILD side effects
CONDOMS must be used CONDOMS must be used CONDOMS must be used
Can I buy PrEP from a chemist?
Yes, but only with a prescription from a medical doctor. If you have prescription, you can also buy it online from the link here – (Hyperlink to Shop with us)
What if I miss a tablet of PrEP on a day?
No worries. Continue taking regularly from the next day.

I started PrEP today. Can I have bareback sex tomorrow?
Being on PrEP is not an alternative to using condoms. Condoms can prevent from HIV and other STDs while PrEP can prevent only from HIV. And PrEP takes times before it becomes effective. PrEP reaches maximum protection from HIV for receptive anal sex (bottom) at about 7 days of daily use. For injection drug use, PrEP reaches maximum protection at about 20 days of daily use. No information is currently available for penetrative anal sex (top). But it may be safe to say that it is not immediate and may take many weeks.
i-PILL FOR HIV: PEP
PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis) is an emergency HIV prevention medicine, which can be used under 72 hours of the risky exposure. It is important to consult a doctor before you take PEP.
What is PEP?
PEP stands for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis, that is, taking HIV medications after a possible exposure to HIV to prevent the HIV virus from establishing an infection in the body. This involves taking a combination of three HIV drugs for a period of 4 weeks. These drugs prevent the HIV virus from multiplying in the immune cells and boosts the immune system of the body to clear this virus.   Typically, PEP is advised for-

  1. People who have had a breach in safety during sex (such as condom breakage and tear)
  2. Individuals who have suffered from sexual assault or rape
  3. Individuals involved in ‘blackouts’ during an episode of ‘chemsex’ or ‘high-fun’
  4. Individuals who had accidental needle sharing or accidental needle prick while preparing drugs.

PEP needs to be started as early as possible, if possible within hours of exposure and by 72 hours at the latest. It needs to be regularly taken for about 4 weeks. PEP is not –

  1. For daily use if you are at high risk of HIV. (PrEP is what you need to use) (Refer to section on PrEP)
  2. A substitute to condom. Condom can prevent from HIV and other STDs. (Refer to section on condom)
  3. For use if your partner is HIV positive. If you have a HIV positive partner, he needs to be on anti-retroviral therapy (ARV), you need to be on PrEP and you should always use condom. (Refer to Living with HIV)
  4. For use if your exposure to HIV has been long ago. It has been shown by research that PEP is not protective if your exposure has been over 72 hours. In such case, you need to get tested at least twice in a period of 3 months to know your HIV status and start anti-retroviral therapy at the earliest if you are positive.
How soon should I take PEP?
PEP must be started as early as possible, latest by 72 hours of exposure. The earlier you start PEP, the better is the success of prevention. Every hour counts in prevention.
How successful is PEP in preventing HIV virus from establishing in body?
PEP is effective in preventing infection if started early and if used regularly. But it is not 100% successful in prevention.
How is PEP different from PrEP and ARV?
PrEP PEP ART
Taking medicines BEFORE EXPOSURE to HIV Taking medicines AFTER possible EXPOSURE to HIV Taking medicines every day AFTER testing POSITIVE to HIV
Your HIV status is NEGATIVE Your HIV status is NEGATIVE Your HIV status is POSITIVE
It is a ROUTINE PREVENTIVE measure It is an EMERGENCY PREVENTIVE measure It is a TREATMENT measure
One pill to be TAKEN EVERYDAY TILL YOU CHOSE to be on PrEP One or two pills to be TAKEN EVERYDAY FOR 28 DAYS One or two pills to be TAKEN EVERYDAY FOR YOUR LIFE TIME
PREVENTS HIV infection PREVENTS HIV infection CONTROLS HIV infection and PREVENTS it from spreading to others
Prevents HIV infection from ALL SEXUAL ACTS Offered only for ANAL SEX and INJECTION DRUG USE Offered to ALL HIV POSITIVE persons
Involves TWO HIV drugs Involves THREE HIV drugs Involves THREE HIV drugs
MILD side effects MILD side effects MILD side effects
CONDOMS must be used CONDOMS must be used CONDOMS must be used
Should I be tested before PEP?
Yes. You must undergo counselling and testing before you are put on PEP. A rapid HIV test is performed before starting you on PEP. In case, you are already positive on a rapid test soon after your possible exposure to HIV, that means the source of your infection if not the recent exposure but a distant exposure. (Refer to Question on window period) Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) is the choice of treatment for you at this stage. If you are negative on the first rapid test, then you are put on PEP which is to be taken for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks of completion of PEP, that is after eight weeks of initiation of PEP, an HIV test is repeated to see if PEP has been successful in preventing the infection. The 4 weeks wait after completion of PEP is essential because PEP is known to delay the establishment of HIV infection when it cannot prevent it. If you are negative on the second test, then you are declared negative. But if you are positive on the second test, then you will have to be started on ART soon.
Can I take PEP after every unsafe sex?
NO. PEP IS ONLY FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS. PEP is not the right choice for people who may be exposed to HIV frequently—for example, if you often have sex without a condom with a partner whose HIV status you are not aware of. Because PEP is given after a potential exposure to HIV, more drugs and higher doses are needed to block infection than with PrEP. If you are at ongoing risk for HIV, consider getting PrEP to reduce your risk of HIV.
I had unsafe sex with a partner who is HIV positive. What do I do now?
DO NOT PANIC Find out if your partner is on HIV medications (Anti-retroviral medications, ART) and if he is regular on it. If he is on ART, find out what his viral loads are. Hyperlink to Living with HIV, question on Viral loads and undetectable) If your partner is on ART and his viral loads are undetectable (that is, very low) for at least 6 months (Refer to Living with HIV, question on undetectable), then your chances of getting HIV is very little and you need not get PEP. If your partner is on ART but his viral loads are not undetectable, then you will need to see a doctor immediately and get on PEP. If you partner is not on ART or is unaware of his viral loads, then you should see a doctor immediately and get on PEP. You must also encourage your partner to get on ARV as it can significantly prolong life span of people living with HIV. (Refer to Living with HIV section)
I had unsafe sex with a friend and we are both worried. Should we both get on PEP?
The first step would be to get tested together and know your HIV statuses. If one of you is positive, then the negative partner should get on PEP and the positive partner should get on ART. If both of you are HIV negative, then the chances of one of you getting HIV is low. But it is still not zero. (Refer to Living with HIV, question on window period). Therefore, the two of you must honestly discuss the recent high-risk exposures you have had and if you think one of you is at risk, immediately visit a doctor and consider getting on PEP.
I had unprotected oral sex. Should I go on PEP?
PEP is not advised for oral sex. PEP is advised for only anal sex and injectable drug use.
How do I get PEP?
PEP is available only on prescription. If you have prescription for PEP, you can buy it online at our online store. (Hyperlink to Shop online)
What are the side effects of PEP?
PEP can have minor side effects such as nausea, stomach upset, feeling of tiredness etc. These are usually mild and reduce within a few days. It is rare for someone to discontinue PEP due to its side effects
What are the precautions to be taken during a course of PEP?
  1. Start PEP early. Preferably within hours. Even though it is advised up to 72 hours after the exposure, it is not likely to be very effective after a 24-48 hours.
  2. Take your medicines regularly. Irregular medication significantly reduces the protection PEP can offer. If you skip your medicines for 48 hours, the course is generally discontinued since it provides no benefit after discontinuing for 48 hours.
  3. Use condoms during sex while you are on PEP.


Aadmi Khoobsoorat Hai To Tum Unsafe Mat Ban Jao! Test karo, PrEP karo aur lambi raahat saans lo! Click here! https://t.co/GSbIONrpCU
.
.
.
#gay #gayindia #gaysex #hivtesting #safesex #safemasti @iHrithik https://t.co/YZcAIEIwk1
SafeMasti photo

Aapne iss Diwali kya kya kiya? Aasha hai jo bhi kiya ho, safe kiya ho! PrEP lene ke liye yahan click karein : https://t.co/GSbIONrpCU
.
.
.
#gay #safesex #prep #hivtesting #hivaids # https://t.co/2L75lrBkAK
SafeMasti photo

Pappu ki shaddi ho gayi re. Ek launda nikal gaya haath se. Ab saare launde ek saath milkar apni test hi karwa lo!
#gay #hiv #ranveer #deepveer #safemasti #SafeSex
@RanveerOfficial @deepikapadukone https://t.co/lOwjHI0JTG
SafeMasti photo

  • 38
  • 2
  • 39
  • 1
  • 44
  • 1
  • 28
  • 0

Safe Masti
Safe Masti
Aadmi Khoobsoorat Hai To Tum Unsafe Mat Ban Jao! Test karo, PrEP karo aur lambi raahat ki saans lo! Click here! https://buff.ly/2QGueHy
.
.
.
#gay #gayindia #gaysex #hivtesting #safesex #safemasti
Hrithik Roshan
Safe Masti
Safe Masti
Aapne iss Diwali kya kya kiya? Aasha hai jo bhi kiya ho, safe kiya ho! PrEP lene ke liye yahan click karein : https://buff.ly/2QGueHy
.
.
.
#gay #safesex #prep #hivtesting #hivaids
Safe Masti
Safe Masti
In Part I, Vivek answered questions about the emotional labour of loving and living with an HIV+ person. In this part, he addresses questions about the practical aspects of their relationship.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
#gay #sex #hiv #livingwithhiv #hivpositive #safesex #SafeMasti

http://safemasti.com/loving-an-hiv-person-part-ii/
Safe Masti
Safe Masti
Always with condom! To buy condoms, please click here : https://buff.ly/2QGueHy
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
#condom #oralsex #gay #msm #india #hivtesting #safesex #safemasti

All content on this website is meant for audiences over 18 years of age. Any material, promotion and content hosted on this site is meant purely for educational purposes, and should not be taken in lieu of medical advice. Please contact a medical professional should you feel that you need specific medical advice.

© Safe Masti. All Rights Reserved